Monday, 2 March 2009

Blog Maintenance: Party Politics

Time is short, but can I just clear up a couple of things?

  1. Thanks for the kind words Iain but this is not a Labour blog.
  2. Even if Iain Dale says otherwise.

And yes it's true that I spoke at the Progress event alongside Tom Barry but that doesn't make me 'Labour' any more than writing for Liberal Conspiracy makes me a Liberal.

As Tom made clear on Saturday, the only allegiance we have is to the left and come the next London elections I will support whichever party(s) or candidate(s) come closest to those ideals.

That said, there is little chance of me ever supporting this man, let alone this man.


14 comments:

Tom said...

Quite. I'm currently leaning towards the Lib Dems, if anyone's counting. Talk of repealing a lot of authoritarian horseshit does it for me. I did, of course, vote for three different parties last May.

However, I do have to say Labourlist is improving, slowly.

AdamB said...

Like most people my ideal party probably doesn't exist. I would say that the Labour party on the assembly is closer to my politics than the Labour party are nationally as are the London Lib Dems and Greens for that matter.

For full disclosure I voted for Ken, Sian and Len Duvall last May. I voted for the Lib Dems under Charles Kennedy in 2005.

Will said...

So Alan Sugar hasn't been asked to stand for Mayor and you aren't a Labour blogger? You can't believe anything you read these days.

Don't Call Me Dave said...

Adam

The only party which has policies I can support 100% has a membership of just one! For most of us, we accept the party we vote for may have some policies which are disagreeable but they are generally not so bad that we would want to vote for a different party.

Everyone will have their own set of red lines which their preferred party must not cross. I voted for Boris at the election, not because I am a Conservative Party Member, but because I was desperate to see the back of Ken, and Boris was the only candidate capable of beating him.

Could Alan Sugar win the Mayoralty back for Labour? I doubt it very much although I think he would have a better chance if he stood as in independent. Politicians are becoming more discredited with every day that passes that even Mr Blobby probably has a good chance!

AdamB said...

I've thought for a while that a strong independent or third party candidate could come through and win at the next Mayoral elections. They will take place two years into a Conservative government where in all probability neither Labour nor the Tories' (nor Boris's) stars will be shining particularly brightly. It all depends on whether anyone credible wants to do it of course and the odds are still on it being another Ken-Boris race.

Anonymous said...

I don’t believe that an independent candidate will ever win the London Mayoral race. What people forget is that to win the Mayoral race you need to have a strong machine behind you. A machine that understands how the electoral system works, and which understands - to coin a phrase - which buttons to press to get people to vote for them.

These machines exist – they are called political parties. The media can claim all they like that it ‘woz them that won it’ but at the end of the day, without the support of thousands of foot soldiers, delivering leaflets, making ‘phone calls, knocking on doors, writing to papers, blogging, twittering, facebooking, flashmobbing – and anything else ‘ing’ I have left out then a Mayoral candidates isn’t going to get the traction they need to even get their name on the ballot paper, never mind win.

Mind you if Sir Alan or Richard Branson happen to read this, I am available for consultancy…J

Iain Dale said...

Adam, I have changed your affiliation in the TP blog directory.

AdamB said...

I'm with you mostly J although it's worth remembering that Ken Livingstone did win as an independent the first time around and he won against the very party machine that you talk about. It was a different time/different circumstances etc, but I do still think it's possible. Other examples can be found internationally as well (and even nationally for that matter). The cards would obviously be stacked against them, but I still think it might be worth putting a tenner on at your local friendly bookie.

AdamB said...

Thanks Iain.

Sunny said...

Heh, nice one. Same here. If someone accused me of being a New Labour supporter I'm not sure if they'd be insulting me or not.

Anonymous said...

I am J. I meant for that to be a smiley at the end of my last comment.

I take your point about Livingstone Adam, but don't forget in his first campaign he had half (if not more) of the London Labour party behind him and working for him. When the national Labour Party found out, they decided not to do anything otherwise they knew they wouldn’t have had a member left in London!

Helen said...

I would've voted for Ken first time around, anyway, but knowing that it was fucking off Blair was an extra incentive, as I'm sure it was for many people.

Tom said...

For me in 2000 it was the public transport thing, where Ken just plain *got it* better than the others (and it wasn't a bad field, was it?). For my other half, who grew up in London in the 1980s it was Ken as the little guy who stood up for London against the Westminster aristocracy, which is much what Helen says.

Obviously that has slightly less appeal in 2008 when you're the Labour candidate stooging about the place with Tessa Bloody Jowell.

Rayyan said...

Interesting thread - arrived here by way of Adam's response to Ugly Bastard Gilligan's claim of Labourishness. I think you'd have to have a long history of involvement with London and London politics to successfully run as an independent - Ken was one of the few people in politics who had the clout. Most people in London automatically vote for Labour or the Tories, so you'd have to find someone pretty damn amazing and who Londoners implicitly trust, in order to even come close to second.