Snipe - The Scoop

Tuesday, 6 July 2010

Boris Johnson to ban 'undemocratic' strikes

After failing to bring in his promised "no strike deal" with the unions, Boris Johnson now wants to ban certain strikes instead.


"between 30 and 40 per cent of a union's entire membership would be required to support industrial action, as well as a majority of those actually voting, to make a strike legal."

They argue that strike ballots with low "turnouts" have no legitimacy and that thresholds would ensure that all strikes have a democratic mandate.

But why stop there? Why not apply the principle elsewhere?

Take Boris's consultation on removing the Western Extension which received the impressive backing of around 0.3% of Londoners.

Or his comrade David Davis, who withdrew his labour at public cost and received the backing of just 24% of his electorate.

Or Boris himself who was elected as Mayor with the first preferences of just 19% of his electorate.

Where was the democratic mandate there Boris? Is it time for another ban?

9 comments:

Colm said...

29% of the electorate voted for him in for his parliamentary seat in 2001 and 36% in 2005. So as a popular Conservative politician in Henley, he was barely legitimate by his own standard.

Colm said...

29% of the electorate voted for him in for his parliamentary seat in 2001 and 36% in 2005. So as a popular Conservative politician in Henley, he was barely legitimate by his own standard.

angelneptunestar said...

This is a totally ridiculous article. If you applied your yardstick to anyone's election results, hardly anyone would get anything, because so many people don't vote and more people voted when Boris stood. He pushed up the vote.

Bob Crow is just a professional trouble maker. He is coining it in, as are all the other train drivers, he is a triple Leo with a huge ego, and Boris never did such a smart thing as when he ignored
the loud mouthed bully and left his underlings to deal with him. I hope he never meets him. Bob Crow is a traitor, he is not a patriot, he is just a traitor.

Every time I see Bob Crow I would like to stand him up against a wall and shoot him. I wouldn't. But I feel like it. Maybe I will send him a white feather instead.

AdamB said...

"If you applied your yardstick to anyone's election results, hardly anyone would get anything, because so many people don't vote"

Er... that's the point.

"Every time I see Bob Crow I would like to stand him up against a wall and shoot him"

First we ban strikes and before you know it we're shooting strike leaders. It's a slippery slope...

Political Animal said...

A quick scout round the 2010 results in London only identifies 4 MPs who meet Boris' requirement for the approval of 40% of their electorate. Perhaps luckily for Boris, one is his brother in Orpington - the members for Beckenham, Ruislip and Twickenham are the others.

And I believe the comparison is valid: the existence of Greg Hands as Housing Minister on the back of 36.3% of the electorate in Chelsea & Fulham will almost certainly have a greater negative long-term effect on the lives of people across the country than anything Bob Crow ever manages.

(Oh, and Angelneptunestar, all train drivers are 'coining it in', are they? You do know that the starting salary for a train driver is all of £17.5k, don't you? I'm not entirely sure how you quantify that in terms of chickenfeed. Perhaps you could enlighten me.)

AdamB said...

"If you applied your yardstick to anyone's election results, hardly anyone would get anything, because so many people don't vote"

Er... that's the point.

"Every time I see Bob Crow I would like to stand him up against a wall and shoot him"

First we ban strikes and before you know it we're shooting strike leaders. It's a slippery slope...

Tom said...

"Every time I see Bob Crow I would like to stand him up against a wall and shoot him. I wouldn't. But I feel like it. Maybe I will send him a white feather instead."

The fact that Bob, as an elected trade union leader, is representing the views of his members is evidently irrelevant, or didn't you know that about trade unions?

Anonymous said...

Most train drivers are not represented by Crow and only a small percentage of the people represented by Crow are train drivers. Most train drivers are in ASLEF. The RMT represents a wide range of people on the railways and in other transport modes, many of whom are on pretty miserable wages.

Train drivers have done fairly well over the last 20 years, though their responsibilities have gone up steeply with one-person-operation of trains, reduction of station staff, tighter safety regimes. It's a skilled job with a long training period and their pay rates aim to retain them after the long training. Pay rates have been pushed up by competition for trained drivers between operating companies, one of the ironic results of rail privatisation.

Guano

eleanargh said...

30% = 40% of a union's entire membership required to support... so if 170 members in my branch wished to strike over an issue, all one million+ members of UNISON would need to be consulted for it to be legal?

Right Boris, whatevs.